HR Pharma News

To Lube or Not to Lube

Lubricating jelly and medical lubricants have become a favored product for improving patient comfort during invasive procedures. The increase in patient comfort has led to improved patient outcomes and satisfaction with their medical services. This helps to reduce the fear and anxiety related to invasive medical procedures, leading to increased patient compliance and better healing. Just think, all of these positives from one simple product!

HR Pharmaceuticals is proud to offer HR Lubricating Jelly for personal and industrial use. It is a sterile, water-soluble, bacteriostatic lubricating jelly that is available in a variety of packaging and volumes. And, while we encourage widespread use of our amazing product, there are a few times when it is not advised you use it, or any other lube for that matter. Follow along in today’s post as we help clarify when and when you should not use lubricating jelly during medical exams or procedures.

When You Should Lube

For the most part, any invasive medical procedures that require you to insert a device or equipment into an orifice, you should lubricate the device. Some examples of procedures include (but are not limited to):

Nasopharyngeal airway (NPA) insertion
Feeding tube insertion
Endoscopy
Ultrasound
Reproductive procedures (will not harm sperm or alter vaginal flora)
Vaginal exam — digital, speculum, ultrasound wand
Rectal exam — digital, tube placement, enema, medication administration, disimpaction, or colonoscopy
Foley catheter insertion

For more in-depth information about these procedures and the use of surgical lubricant, read our article here.

When You Don’t Need Lubricant

Because of how proud we are of our superior medical lube, we hate to admit that there are times when you should refrain from using it, but it would be irresponsible of us to market it as a product that can be used in every procedure. Here are a few times that you shouldn’t use ours, or any other, lubricating jelly.

Airway insertion

Inserting an NPA requires lubrication because it enters the nose, a mucousy orifice. Not using a lubricant in this instance can cause considerable friction and damage to the airway. Oral airways including orotracheal intubation or oropharyngeal airway (OPA), do not require lubrication as it can enter the lungs and cause more harm than good.

Otoscope use

When looking in the ears with any device, it is not necessary, nor is it advised to use lubricant of any kind. The ear is a dry membrane and should never be penetrated. An otoscope, or auriscope, should only be inserted far enough to visualize the tympanic membrane and no further. Using any sort of fluid or lubricant can cause damage to the eardrum and is not advised unless otherwise ordered.

Venous access

Puncturing the skin for the purpose of venous access should never be accompanied by a lubricant of any kind. We understand your desire to want to make the procedure more comfortable and establish a way to make the needle cause as little friction or discomfort as possible, but this should be achieved by using the sharpest, highest-quality needles in the appropriate gauge. Lubricants are not intended to enter the circulatory system and should not be used for this purpose.

Procedures of the eye.

While HR Lubricating Jelly is safe for internal use, it should not be introduced into the eye. In the event of accidental eye exposure to our product, flush thoroughly with water.

We hope that this discussion has provided some clarification on the intended use of HR Lubricating Jelly. For more information, be sure to visit us online or contact us. For all of your lubricant needs, shop our entire product line today.

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